Fun With Fall Leaves

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This was a cute post i found here about making a candle holder using fall leaves. I’m a sucker for fall! I love the smell of it in the air, everything has a burnished look, the beautifully colored leaves dancing in the cool breezes, all the way to the spicy scent of baked goods. When I saw this pin, it was a no brainer!
You start with a glass jar, mine was an old pickle jar, some mod podge and, of course, fall leaves. After my first attempt, I actually read the blog, instead of just looking at the pictures because it turned out a little goofy!

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The leaves kept popping off the edges and refused to lie flat. Yes, inanimate objects refused to listen to me!

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After reading the blog, I learned you need to press the leaves for at least 36 hours. Simple process: pick the leaves you like, get a thick book (my choice was What to Expect in the First Year), and put the leaves between the pages.

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After the leaves are pressed, you start your process. I’ve found it’s easiest to do small sections at a time. Don’t coat the entire jar at once, or you’ll never get it done before it starts to dry.

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After you have some mod podge on the glass, press your leaf onto the glue. You will need to press the leaf for a few minutes until it has good adhesion, then paint another layer of mod podge over the top. This extra layer helps give the leaves a shiny look and helps preserve the color.
I still had the problem of the edges of the leaves popping up a little, but it’s still beautiful with the candle flickering inside!
Happy crafting!

Bottlecap Magnets

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I’ve actually done something similar to this shortly after I began blogging. We started, inadvertently, collecting bottlecaps awhile ago when we hung up the bottle opener Marlboro sent me as a birthday present. I hung a basket under it so Tony didn’t have to keep catching them to throw them away. It’s been working great!

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I have always loved repurposing things, and I’ve discovered many new ways to do so through Pinterest.
I also have a great love of putting pictures up around the house! You start by finding some pictures that have a small focal point, like a face or an animal that is 1″ or less in size. The original pinner said to use a 1″ punch-out, but my supplies don’t run to such things, so I just used scissors. If it’s not a perfect circle, that’s fine! Once your picture is small enough to fit in your bottlecap, pour a small amount of mod podge into the cap and press your picture down. Make sure the picture is fully covered.

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Don’t worry, your picture will be invisible until it dries. It’s supposed to be like that! The original pinner says to use glue to adhere the picture to the bottlecap, then cover with a glaze. I used mod podge on my previous bottlecap project and that turned out great. Check out those results at https://superstevied.wordpress.com/2013/03/31/cute-little-doo-dad/
Once you have your picture under your layer of mod podge, you’ll have to let it sit, at least overnight, to dry. Once it’s fully dried, so you can see your picture again, cut your magnets to fit the back of your bottlecap. I know the next time I do this, I’m going to buy the heavy duty round magnets so I can use these to hold up assorted items on the fridge.
For now, I can’t wait to see the kids reaction to these magnets in the morning!
Original pin came from http://doitdarling.com/2013/03/02/fridge-magnets-out-of-bottle-caps/

Glitter Candle Jars

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This one was super easy and kid friendly. Two of my favorite features in a pin! ^.^
Over the last several months I’ve been stockpiling assorted jars and wine bottles for different projects. Sometimes it pays off!
I’ve recently adapted one of my thirty-one large utility totes into a craft bag, in an attempt to keep my supplies together. Keeping that bag with my scrap poking supplies keeps my bases covered!
I drew from my magic tote, my mod-podge and diamond dust. I used one of my sponge brushes, got some mod-podge on the side of it and brushed it all around the inside of my empty and clean jars.
Now it’s time to let the kids play. I dumped a bit of diamond dust into the jar, while the mod-podge was still wet, and let them spin it around and around. I dumped the excess dust onto my newspaper table protector.
Then you just let everything dry and insert a tea light candle into your jar and let it sparkle!
The original pinner said she used a glue wash (Elmer’s glue + water) instead of mod-podge, but I had the mod-podge handy. Then she said you can use whatever glitter you would like.
The only place I disagree with the original pinner is over when is the appropriate time for glitter is. She says Christmas is the only acceptable time. My argument: don’t let anyone dull your sparkle! I think glitter is appropriate anytime, as long as it doesn’t cover everything you own. Tony did agree that these would be a beautiful centerpiece for Christmas, especially if I put them on a cheerful plate.
Happy crafting and keep on sparkling!
Original pin can be found at http://cakerypapery.com/2012/11/27/festive-holiday-diy-glitter-mason-jar-candles/

Candle holders

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The pictures attached to the original pin were beautiful. This was so visually appealing that as soon as I started completing pins, I wanted to try this one. It took me a while to find some of the stuff I needed so I’ve only recently done this.
Step one is to buy some vellum, which I had a hard time finding.
Once you have the vellum you print your picture in black and white, or a sepia tone would be really pretty too! Choose a vase or any clear glass, smooth edged holder.
Then we go back to my old friend mod podge. You run some mod podge over the glass surface and gently place your picture.
I went all out the first time and did an 8×10 of our Gettysburg family picture on a tall glass vase. I quickly realized this is not a simple process! I had so many bubbles under the surface that the picture was almost unrecognizable. When I tried to smooth them out, I tore the vellum. It is very delicate after all. There was also the problem of ink running when combined with glue through vellum.
I decided to go small the next time around and chose this small votive holder and used my children’s 3 and 6 year old pictures.
If you want to try this, I would definitely recommend starting small with a practice votive holder!
I have another vellum picture from Gettysburg ready to go, and the original vase washed clean so I can start fresh.
Truthfully, I’m working up to it because its a little intimidating. I’m thinking these would make wonderful Christmas gifts, or maybe an anniversary gift.
As you can tell by the picture on the left, be sure the light level will shine through your whole picture.
Il try to post a picture of the final project when I get it right…..
Original pin can not be credited due to a bad link, but directions, other than the ones included in this post, can be found on my crafty&decor board, ads061006.
Happy crafting!