Victorian Photography Studio

Victorian Photography Studio

I know it’s been a few weeks since I’ve been, but I’m still having so much fun with the memories (and pictures and evidence)!
I finally found a frame that I like for this photo (I have a habit of stock-piling frames) and I got it hung up in the house. This was my personal favorite thing we did while in Gettysburg.
I spent a lot of time on tripadvisor.com while planning this trip and this photography studio popped up. I spent a lot of time on the website. The pictures looked amazing, but I kept waffling over the price. Finally, I decided, that we were saving so much money with the inexpensive things we were doing, that we could afford this.
So I started sending e-mails to the owners. I wanted to be sure about the pricing since I was having a little trouble being sure of how the pricing works. I heard back from the owners almost immediately explaining how much it would be for what I wanted.
Second question came from my husband. He was wondering, since we were bringing the dogs, could we have them in the picture. Again, I heard back from the owner almost immediately, absolutely we could bring the dogs, that’s no problem.
Third and final question was if I could still book an appointment since their website wasn’t taking my credit card. Again, that’s not a problem, of course they will make our appointment.
So I was already thrilled with their service before we even left home! Once we arrived for our appointment, we had a few minutes to wait, then were shown to where the photo would be taken. They started with getting my daughter and I dressed first and that was fun. The lady did come in with us, but some of the clothing is a little difficult, so it’s understandable. I’m not shy, so this was no big deal. Chiara loved the clothes too! I was a little concerned about the hair, and was wondering how I could style it to work with the photo. No problems there because she styled my hair quickly and efficiently. Chiara and I got to twirl around while the guys got dressed up.
This is such a family friendly place! We went with the digital because the wet plate style requires perfect stillness for 24 seconds. Not recommended for pets and small children! The photographers were amazing, getting the kids to cooperate and they were just so patient. They were even relaxed about getting the dogs to cooperate, which as you can tell, they did!
It took 30 minutes (if I remember correctly) for them to develop the pictures. I walked in and picked them up, no fuss, no muss.
The photos were amazing, the experience was amazing! If you are in Gettysburg, make your appointment early because they fill up quick! It does feel expensive, mainly because I tend to be thrifty (read cheap), but I was completely satisfied with it!
This pin gets 2 thumbs way, way up!
Check out their website here

Gettysburg Ghost Tours

Gettysburg Ghost Tours

I will be honest and tell you that I did not go on this tour myself, but these experiences are from Tony, my husband.
We, Tony especially, are very interested in the paranormal. When I picked out Gettysburg for Arthur’s Spring Break, this was one of the draws that helped me convince Tony to agree. He loves those shows on tv where they hunt the ghosts, so he was excited about using the tools of the trade.
I will not lie, if you go to Gettysburg, walking down the main drag you will be overwhelmed by the number of “ghost hunting” opportunities. There are some that allow you to bring your pets, there are some that are family friendly and believe me, I researched before we left. Gettysburg Ghost Tours, at 47 Steinwehr Ave, was one of the few I found where they use the same tools you see on the shows. There were several options of tours. There was a regular “ghost walk” that struck me as more of a history lesson while walking around town. This seemed like more of a family thing, and not quite what Tony was looking for. They had an overnight tour that sounded like fun, but we knew that Tony would’ve been up all day the day before the tour so that would’ve been really exhausting.
He ended up choosing their Xtreme Ghost Hunt. It seemed a little pricey, at $55, but as you can see from the picture there were some definite perks. I deliberately waited until we got the ‘evidence’ to blog about this. Tony enjoyed it a lot, his only complaint was that their stop at a haunted school-house was a little over-crowded. He said it was a tiny building and with 20 of them, they were practically tripping over each other.
The perks of this tour, that ran from 11pm-2am, was a certificate stating that he had participated in their ghost hunt, a group shot and a DVD of the videos he took on their equipment, different thermal images and other assorted evidence. He was really excited when he got it in the mail and I enjoyed watching his tour evidence.
If ghost hunting is something you would like to try and you end up in the Gettysburg area, make sure you stop by here and at least check them out!
Check out their homepage

Sachs Covered Bridge

Sachs Covered Bridge

Not near as moving as the Sallie story, but the Sachs covered bridge is another must see at Gettysburg. The bridge is just a beautiful example of covered bridges. It does have names carved into the beams and assorted things written on the beams, but it’s still beautiful and worth the short drive from the main street.
The bridge was originally built in 1854 for the price of $1,544. That’s absolutely fascinating to me considering they are spending over 2 million on bridge repairs for the I-90 bridge back in Cleveland!
July 1, 1863 the bridge was crossed by 2 brigades of Union soldiers on their way into Gettysburg. The bridge was also used four days later by General Lee’s retreating army after their defeat in Gettysburg.
In 1938 the bridge was declared Pennsylvania’s most historic bridge, In 1968 the bridge was closed to vehicular traffic but remained open to pedestrians. In 1980 it was added to the Register of Historic Places.
1996 there was a flash flood that knocked the bridge off of it’s abutments. The plans already in place to repair the bridge went from $500,000 to $600,000. The bridge was rededicated on July 27, 1997.
There are mixed reviews on the bridge’s….. guests shall we say? Many reviews that I’ve read online say the sprits at the bridge are friendly, playful even. However I’ve found one that says 3 Confederate soldiers, convicted as spies, were hung from the beams of the bridge and later discovered by Union forces on patrol. Some visitors at the bridge have felt and angry presence, which if I had been hung off the bridge, I’d be pretty upset myself. Others claim to have smelled someone smoking a pipe, insisting that it’s General Lee.
I don’t know about all that. We were there 3 times on this Gettysburg trip, not at night however. It was colder on the bridge than in the surrounding areas. My son called it the ghost bridge, I do believe kids are more open to things that are ‘other’. Several pictures had grey-blue orbs. Yes, yes I know some will insist it’s just dust, and most of the time I would be skeptical too. My argument against the dust theory this time is: I took several shots back to back and the orbs are in select shots. If the bridge was raining dust, there would’ve been dust in many more shots instead of the 3 I have.
Believe, don’t believe. Whatever your preference, I would say this bridge is a definite must see on your Gettysburg trip!
Check out the picture I originally pinned

Sallie the Civil War dog

Sallie the Civil War dog

Normally I do crafty or yummy things, but I saw this today in person, and it was one of the most moving things I’ve seen in my life.
A brief history of Sallie: the 11th PA Volunteer Infantry Regiment was in their first month of training in 1861 when someone in town brought the commander a pug-nose brindle bull terrier. She quickly won over the unit and became their mascot. The dog was beloved by the unit and disliked only 3 things: Rebels, Democrats and Women.
During battles she was on the front line barking ferociously at the enemy. She was so fierce even Abraham Lincoln acknowledged her with the salute of a lifted hat.
During the first day of battle at Gettysburg, she lost her unit. By the end of the 3 day battle she was back with her unit, fiercly standing guard over the dead.
Sallie was wounded in the neck, but bravely continued on in Spotsylvania. February 6, 1865 at Hatcher’s Run, Sallie was with the first wave of her unit. When the second wave advanced, they found her shot in the head. The weeping men buried their beloved mascot on the battlefield.
In 1890, the surviving members of the 11th dedicated a monument to all the men who died in the great battle of Gettysburg. It stands on Oak Ridge overlooking the field from which the Rebels advanced. Something you don’t see unless you get out of your car and walk around is the small pug-nose brindle bull terrier at the base, watching over her unit for all eternity.
Many people had left coins as a tribute for Sallie. I don’t usually carry change, but traveling with the dogs meant I had dog treats in my pocket. We left Sallie a treat and I got to enjoy this moment with my puppies. There is no road marker to let you know it’s there, but if you travel to Gettysburg and take the self-guided auto tour (it’s free), make sure you stop on Oak Ridge and find Sallie’s statue. Leave a coin or a treat for one of the most loyal soldier’s of the Civil War!
Original pin found here
If you enjoyed this story of a hero dog, check out Gabe’s story here.